Posted in Photography

Another Wildlife Spotting

I love shooting wildlife. And by that, of course, I mean shooting them with a camera. Wherever I go, my camera is slung over my shoulder, waiting to be pointed at whatever animal comes my way. It’s been with me around Africa as I tracked lions, rhino, crocodiles, and hippos. It’s been with me in South and Southeast Asia as I went in search of leopards, komodo dragons, and elephants. And while in Scotland, it’s also served me well as last week I was incredibly fortunate in spotting a red fox chasing a rabbit through a field.

Around Scotland, you’ll often find deer in the forests and on the hills, but they’re sometimes difficult to see. At best, you can expect them to appear virtually on the horizon, and if you get any closer, they’ll bound off out of sight in a heartbeat. They are beautiful but very shy animals. I see a lot of them in my walks when back home in Scotland, but even the 42x optical zoom on my camera struggles to capture them adequately. However, yesterday I managed to get a closer experience.

I was out walking on my own over Lucklaw Hill when suddenly a small roe deer appeared in front of me. It was perhaps about fifty feet ahead. It clearly hadn’t noticed me, and when it turned away I stalked closer. I was able to shoot a few dozens photos, but as the light was poor, not many of them turned out well.

This was one of the best:

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The next photo I took was a bit better, and captured the animal as I finally noticed me:

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When finally it realized that I was a person and that it had better not hang about, it turned and ran up a steep hill, making an odd barking noise just once, and then disappeared into the trees.

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Posted in Photography

Walking from Elie to St. Monans

Yesterday, on a windy but warm summer day, I walked from the little harbour town of Elie to another little harbour town called St. Monans with my mum. The coast of Fife – and indeed much of Scotland – is dotted with these little picturesque fishing towns comprised of old stone houses that are often painted in bright colours, narrow winding roads, and flower pots dotted around. In the harbour itself there are invariably boats either bobbing in the water or resting on the sand.

We arrived to a busy car park and headed out into the cold, but soon after starting out the coast cut off the worst of the wind, and in the sunshine it was actually quite warm. The walk along the beach was pleasant, and soon we moved up onto the little path, passing by many others who’d spotted a good opportunity for a Sunday walk.

The pleasant scenery made for a good day taking photos:

 

My favourite, however, was a shot I took of St. Monans harbour:

St. Monans Harbour

Posted in Photography

Summer Walks in Fife

For the past week and a half I have been back home in Scotland for a wee visit. It’s been three years since I was in Scotland during the summer, and I’ve been making the most of it by getting out on some long walks. Mostly those walks have been near my parents’ house, but I’ve also been to Maspie Den, near Falkland.

The scenery there is very pleasant, and includes the nearby Lomond Hills:

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On my walks I’ve been fortunate enough to spot some interesting wildlife:

There have also been a few deer spottings but I have no good pictures as they’ve always been too far away. But the absolute highlight was a red fox I saw yesterday while out hiking with my younger brother.

Red fox in a field

Aside from Fife I also got over to Edinburgh for a catch-up with an old friend. We mostly spent our time in the bars so there aren’t an abundance of good photos to share. However, I liked this shot of Edinburgh castle behind a thistle.

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Posted in essay

#SharkAwarenessDay

So apparently today is Shark Awareness Day. Or #SharkAwarenessDay. I don’t know. Perhaps one day all festivals will come with hashtags. How else would we know about them? #thanksinternet

Although admittedly I didn’t know today was Shark Awareness Day (I’ll drop the hastags now), or indeed that there even was such a thing, I thought I’d make a short post here because there may be a few people who read this blog that didn’t see the news on Twitter or Facebook or wherever else they go to be informed about what’s going on in the world.

I love sharks. They are, without question, my favourite animals. I even have one tattooed on my right arm:

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Photo taken last year in South Africa

I don’t know why I love sharks so much. Maybe it’s because they’re absolutely perfect – giant atavistic animals unchanged in tens of millions of years. Maybe it’s because they’re profoundly misunderstood beings. Maybe it’s because they’re just unbelievably cool in every way. Or maybe it’s because – as I rediscovered when I got back home to my parents’ house this summer – I had a ton of books about sharks when I was a kid.

In any case, I think sharks are amazing. I’ve spent my adult life travelling around in search of sharks, and have been lucky to have swum with them on a few different occasions. Unfortunately, I’ve never actually gotten a very good photo of a shark, but this one wasn’t too bad:

Blacktip reef shark
Photo taken in Malaysia last summer.

In early 2016 I made it to Cape Town and finally saw a large Great White Shark. Again, getting a decent photo was a challenge and this was the best I could do:

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Every year, people kill tens of millions of sharks. Sometimes it’s for food, sometimes for sport, and sometimes just as a byproduct of other kinds of fishing. The image of sharks conjured up in popular culture is that of a mindless killing-machine and their plight elicits no sympathy. It is more important than ever that we learn to respect sharks and acknowledge their importance in the ocean ecosystem, as sharks are a sign of a healthy ocean.

Many people are afraid of sharks and that is understandable. However, only five people a year are killed by sharks. Statistically you are far more likely to be killed by bees or horses. Whenever I’ve swum with sharks, the sharks have been more afraid of me than I of they. We really ought to educate people better and remove this irrational fear before it is too late to save these amazing animals.

Posted in travel

Where to Travel in Late July?

I have an unusual problem: I don’t know where to go on holiday this summer. Maybe it’s not so unusual, but specifically what I’m struggling with is having too many choices.

I’ve blogged about this before, although in those posts I was leaning towards the Philippines and Nepal. However, circumstances have changed. Right now I’m in Scotland and I intend to stay here another week. At the beginning of August I need to be in China and then, around the 6th, I will take my girlfriend somewhere – probably Thailand – before returning to work in China in September.

That means I have 2-3 weeks to spend somewhere and, quite frankly, that somewhere could be anywhere. It’s not the worst problem to have. I’m very aware of how privileged that makes me. Yet it’s actually driving me a little crazy.

Every day I check www.skyscanner.net and instead of putting in a destination, I put in my point of departure and type “everywhere.” Then I sort by price and places I’ve not been. As I’ve only visited 30 countries so far, surely there’s plenty left to see, right?

Well. It’s not quite so simple.

Firstly, I wanted to go to East Africa. I’ve always wanted to see Kenya and Tanzania, and maybe Uganda, Rwanda, and Ethiopia. Last year I caught the safari bug after trips in Southern Africa. However, the more I thought about it, the less likely it seemed I could do the region justice in 2-3 weeks. Moreover, flights that had originally seemed quite cheap started to rise in price and made it a bit less appealing.

On the other side of the continent is Morocco, which I’ve always wanted to see. (I did write a book about William S. Burroughs after all.) I’d love to check out Tangier, Casablanca, and Marrakech. But then getting from Morocco back to China would be a bit expensive. The same goes for other countries in Western Africa.

Then I was looking at Nepal. I’ve always wanted to go there and it’s on the way back to China, so actually seemed a reasonable option. But it’s monsoon season there at the moment, and Chitwan National Park, which seemed like a cool place to visit, is going to be off-limits. Then there’s Everest and getting to Base Camp and back takes at least a fortnight’s trek. The more I looked at it, the less Nepal seemed like something to do in the summer.

After that I thought about Europe, but where? I’d like to take trains and buses between the capitals and maybe work my way over to Istanbul and the divide between Europe and Asia. Or, if that was unrealistic in terms of time, then maybe fly from the U.K. to somewhere in Eastern Europe and work my way down to Istanbul. It’s a bit expensive, but with night trains and hostels, it’s not out of the question. But Europe doesn’t really excite me… I’m more taken with Africa and Asia.

As I searched for more options, I found there are cheap flights now between Edinburgh and a few locations in New England. But America is pricey, too, and I’ve already seen enough of it for now. Besides, although I love America, I’m not really in the mood for it, especially now that Trump is so-called president and the N.S.A. persists in making life miserable for visitors.

So… where to go?

I realize this is not a bad problem to have, but it’s one that’s really bugging me. For the time being I’m happy to enjoy being at home, but when it comes time to move on, I do want to do one of the following:

  • Explore a new country
  • Have an adventure
  • Relax on a beach
  • See some amazing animals

Suggestions welcome below.

Posted in travel

Back in Scotland

A few weeks ago I taught my last class of the semester and began the arduous task of marking nearly 200 exam papers, writing reports, and filing all the details in both English and Chinese-language computer systems. I usually do it all quickly and get the hell out of China as quickly as possible, but this year my school failed to procure my new visa in a timely fashion and I was stuck with my tedious paperwork in the sweltering heat of Eastern China.

On Monday afternoon, I got my passport back from the government and immediately booked the next available – and affordable – flight back to Scotland. So the next morning I took a train for Shanghai and then a flight to Beijing. Irritatingly, a thunderstorm over the capital caused my flight to be cancelled, but I was able to get another one and only just made my next flight, which was to Manchester. Eleven hours later I was back in Britain and waiting for a third flight – this one to Edinburgh.

For the past day, I’ve been enjoying some family time and also very much appreciating being back in an environment with fresh air. Yesterday the weather was surprisingly warm for a Scottish summer, and today it was overcast but still pleasantly warm. I took a stroll on Tentsmuir Beach with the family, where we saw some seals and sea birds.

I will be in Scotland another week or so before travelling down through England and then on to Nepal. I had intended to travel Africa this summer but as it transpires I don’t have as much time as I’d like to spend there. So instead I intend to explore Nepal until early August, and then somewhere in Southeast Asia – possibly Thailand – with my girlfriend until the end of the summer.

Do any of my readers have tips for Nepal? I’m currently thinking of seeing Chitwan National Park and a little of the Himalayas.

Posted in update

Publishing Stuff

I mostly use this blog for travel and photography, but I’m sure that my followers know I also do a spot of literary work. Over at www.beatdom.com, you’ll find me musing the Beat Generation. Beatdom is a literary journal that mostly publishes essays about the Beats (and related artists) but also runs the occasional poem or short story.

Last month, Beatdom turned ten years old. We celebrated by publishing our eighteenth issue. I can hardly believe that it’s been a full decade… for a small literary journal, that’s a hell of an achievement.

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In 2010, I think, we grew from just publishing the literary journal into being a publishing company that puts out books about the Beats. At the beginning of May, we released Beat Transnationalism by John Tytell, and we have another two books set for release this year. (I’m also working on a book about Allen Ginsberg, which I expect to finish in 2018.)

I devote most of my time these days to teaching, with any spare time set aside for Beatdom; however, over the past year I’ve been reading into Aldous Huxley, and I wrote this short article about his interest in Scientology. As Tony Ortega astutely noted, it seems I’m developing my own bizarre area of literary studies. A couple of years ago, I wrote a book about William S. Burroughs’ interest in Scientology.

Posted in travel

Modern Art in an Ancient Setting

Today is Dragon Boat Festival here in China. It’s an old holiday in celebration of a poet called Quyuan, who allegedly killed himself after seeing his country fall apart. In fact, many people today believe that he was either gay or sleeping with the emperor’s daughter, so perhaps it’s not the patriotic tale that the government tries to present. Or maybe people just like gossip. In any case, it’s revered by most Chinese not as a day to celebrate the past or eat zongzi, but as a few days’ holiday from work.

Unfortunately, in China, the government enjoys the old bait-and-switch of giving you a holiday but then requiring you to work it off later. That means a Monday off work requires you to do a Saturday at work and so on. It’s a cruel ruse. Nevertheless, I finagled Saturday afternoon off work and headed from Huainan down to Hefei for the long weekend. It started, alas, at the dentist, but by Saturday night I was taking in live music and drinking nice whiskey.

On the Sunday I rode the new Hefei subway line out to Binhu, near Chaohu. It is amazing how fast this city has grown. I first came to Hefei in 2010 and it seems to have more than tripled in size. It is, in fact, virtually unrecognizable. The whole area of Binhu was fields when I first arrive, and now it is practically a city center to itself. There are vast shopping malls, theme parks, exorbitant hotels, and every self-respecting franchise has a couple of locations here now.

With a group of friends, I drove around the western end of Chaohu (the suffix -hu means “lake” in Chinese, so this is Chao Lake) to a small village where my friend was participating in an art show. The route was scenic enough, but it was here that I ran my first and only marathon back in 2015, and I felt exhausted just sitting in the back of a car.

At the small village, we soon found the old cluster of buildings that would house a small art show. Inside, modern art clashed strangely with the old walls and doors, and sat out unnaturally against the blue skies and green gardens. Yet somehow it was really very pretty. The art was all rather obvious, but nonetheless interesting. It all seemed to revolve around themes of environmentalism, which was pleasant to see. Someone had framed the door to a bathroom with a sign that said, essentially, “All life is art.” It reminded me of being a student and hearing that sort of thing come from my artsy friends. It sounded marginally less stupid back then.

I was approached by a team of reporters from Anhui TV, who asked to interview me, and then followed me around the grounds of the building as I perused the art work. In the end, I never did get their contact detail and I don’t watch TV so I probably won’t get to see myself wandering awkwardly, pretending not to notice all the people following me.

My favourite exhibit was a bizarre one comprised of two Irishmen playing traditional music with a Chinese piper, while another Chinese man tattooed the piper’s back. Everyone crammed into this tiny room and jostled for the best position to film the spectacle. However, if you looked carefully you would see some odd Chinese characters on the back wall which, when read backwards, make fun of the people in the room. It basically says “People are so stupid these days that they will crowd around and stare at anything.”

Ouch.

After the art show, we all spent the night in Binhu. It’s seemed like an entirely different city from the rest of Hefei. It’s all so new and, with the right light, it was actually quite pretty. Travelling in China on holidays is a nightmare, but it’s nice to know that without going too far, you can still get away from it all and see something new.

Posted in update

Where to visit in the Philippines?

Way back in 2008, not long after I first arrived in Asia, I took a trip to the Philippines. At that time I was working for a crooked hagwon in Daegu, South Korea, and I was physically and mentally exhausted. I needed a break and so when a group of very new friends I met in a bar suggested all travelling to the Philippines together, I jumped at the opportunity.

Soon we were in Moalboal, a beautiful little village which is popular for scuba diving. I was too exhausted from work to bother with the diving, and so instead I sat on my balcony and watched the fish and sharks in the water below, sometimes tearing myself away from a bottle of rum long enough to join them.

Here are some photos from that trip. (Keep in mind I was a terrible photographer back then and using a terrible little point-and-shoot camera).

This year, I have some time off in the summer and I would like to get back to the Philippines. One of the reasons is that it costs less than $200 for me to fly almost anywhere there from China.

As I’ve not seen much more than Cebu (and even then I mostly sat on my balcony with a bottle of rum for a week), I would like to explore further.

My ideas thus far are:

My main concern is time. I will be travelling with my girlfriend and she only has 10 days off work. We can get to almost any of these places pretty quickly, but travelling around would be very limited. Instead, we need to find a place that would be good for a little over a week’s stay, and which would require very minimal travelling from the nearest airport.

Please type your suggestions below. Any advice is very much appreciated.