Posted in essay

#SharkAwarenessDay

So apparently today is Shark Awareness Day. Or #SharkAwarenessDay. I don’t know. Perhaps one day all festivals will come with hashtags. How else would we know about them? #thanksinternet

Although admittedly I didn’t know today was Shark Awareness Day (I’ll drop the hastags now), or indeed that there even was such a thing, I thought I’d make a short post here because there may be a few people who read this blog that didn’t see the news on Twitter or Facebook or wherever else they go to be informed about what’s going on in the world.

I love sharks. They are, without question, my favourite animals. I even have one tattooed on my right arm:

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Photo taken last year in South Africa

I don’t know why I love sharks so much. Maybe it’s because they’re absolutely perfect – giant atavistic animals unchanged in tens of millions of years. Maybe it’s because they’re profoundly misunderstood beings. Maybe it’s because they’re just unbelievably cool in every way. Or maybe it’s because – as I rediscovered when I got back home to my parents’ house this summer – I had a ton of books about sharks when I was a kid.

In any case, I think sharks are amazing. I’ve spent my adult life travelling around in search of sharks, and have been lucky to have swum with them on a few different occasions. Unfortunately, I’ve never actually gotten a very good photo of a shark, but this one wasn’t too bad:

Blacktip reef shark
Photo taken in Malaysia last summer.

In early 2016 I made it to Cape Town and finally saw a large Great White Shark. Again, getting a decent photo was a challenge and this was the best I could do:

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Every year, people kill tens of millions of sharks. Sometimes it’s for food, sometimes for sport, and sometimes just as a byproduct of other kinds of fishing. The image of sharks conjured up in popular culture is that of a mindless killing-machine and their plight elicits no sympathy. It is more important than ever that we learn to respect sharks and acknowledge their importance in the ocean ecosystem, as sharks are a sign of a healthy ocean.

Many people are afraid of sharks and that is understandable. However, only five people a year are killed by sharks. Statistically you are far more likely to be killed by bees or horses. Whenever I’ve swum with sharks, the sharks have been more afraid of me than I of they. We really ought to educate people better and remove this irrational fear before it is too late to save these amazing animals.

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