Using the Internet in China

Today I woke up and saw that the internet had gone done across much of the Western world… or at least that’s how it was presented. Twitter and Reddit were down, and a ton of other sites. It had all happened while I was asleep because I live on the other side of the world, in China.

Where did I see this news? The same place people get most of their news these days – Facebook, Twitter, Reddit. In this hyper-connected world of ours, it’s impossible to overstate the importance of the internet, and in particular social media. I wonder what would happen if the attack had been bigger… much bigger. How would people survive? How would they even know what’s going on? Of course, those of us who lived pre-Facebook would adapt pretty quickly, but the others? For them, it would probably feel like the apocalypse.

I don’t need to use much imagination to get inside the minds of those who tried and failed to get online last night. Living in China, not being able to get on the above mentioned websites is pretty common. For me to visit Facebook this morning, or, for that matter, almost any website I regularly use, required me to use a VPN. I pay about $100 per year for this service, which I think is very reasonable. Overall, it’s pretty good. I’m able to check my e-mail and do most basic things I need to. Sometimes, I’m able to watch videos on YouTube – although it can be slow and frustrating.

Without a VPN, the websites that you can visit from China are pretty limited in number, and those which are technically open are usually excruciatingly slow. Sometimes, it can actually be impossible to get any functionality from them whatsoever. To be honest, I don’t even try any more. If my VPN is down, I take a deep breath and then spend my time doing something offline – like going for a run or reading a book. It’s particularly aggravating, however, when I need to do something – like answer an important e-mail, prepare for class, or do some research. It is terribly frustrating to know that I need to do something, yet the rules made by a group of corrupt sociopaths in the government to keep their populace in the dark about their shady practices ensures that my work sometimes needs to be hindered.

But it’s best not to think about it when possible.

The internet in China is not all bad. I live in a small town in the middle of nowhere and yet I get a relatively fast connection at home or via 4G. This place is almost third world, yet even here amidst the poverty and ancient superstitions, we can stream music or movies. Assuming I want to use a Chinese website, it works great. Of course, that severely limits my internet use. If I want to use WeChat to talk to friends, great! If I want to download music from QQ or KuGou, fantastic! Taobao and Alipay are brilliant apps, too. Beyond that, the Chinese internet is sort of like the more vapid parts of the real internet – aka what you can access beyond the Great Firewall. Imagine the idiots you went to school with, for whom the most important thing in the world is who won last night’s celebrity-reality-variety-chat show, or whatever gossip has inexplicably gotten its way onto the front page of the tabloid “news” papers. Imagine the sort of vapid crap that they post on social media, and then tone its intellectual level down even further, translate into Chinese, and add more noise and bright colours. Thanks to censorship, there simply is modern culture in China.

Of course, it goes without saying that being offline is no bad thing. I loved traipsing through Southern Africa or sailing along the Indonesian archipelago, completely disconnected from the internet, with absolutely no way of getting online – no notifications, no pings, no bleeps. It felt great. But that’s not really possible or desirable in day-to-day life, even out in the boondocks of China. Surrounded by the majesty of nature, technology can seem an unpleasant distraction, but in the polluted, grey, backwards wastelands of Anhui Province, it is more like a lifeline. Moreover, I’m a teacher and if I need ideas or resources for class, I need the internet. I’m a writer and editor, so I need the internet to research or publish. I live on the opposite side of the globe from my friends and family, so I need the internet to communicate.

There are innumerable reasons why living in China can be difficult, and the internet may seem like a trivial one, but it really isn’t. I can’t abide censorship, and when that censorship – perpetrated, like all censorships, for spurious reasons – negatively effects my life, my business, my ability to teach using the best available resources… well, that is what I consider intolerable living conditions. If the government announced tomorrow that they were cracking down on VPNs, I’d be on a flight out of here the next day – or at least I’d try, but without access to SkyScanner or eBookers it might be difficult.

So, looking across the world at the turmoil of a temporary disconnection from the internet, I do feel a certain empathy. It’s easy to mock, but being forced offline when you genuinely need to be online can be more than an inconvenience.

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Just China Things

I’d meant to put up a new post this week, but I haven’t been able to. First, I’m trying to keep a regular schedule of posting photos and stories from my Africa trip during January and February. The next installment is Zimbabwe. Then there’s last year’s North Korea trip, which I’d promised to put online. Whenever North Korea is in the news and people start pontificating on political matters, I’m tempted to post some of my photos from the country, where you actually see the people. I feel it helps us stay grounded and stop silly abstract talk of war.

Unfortunately, I live in China. That means I’m subject to mindless censorship. Personally, I think that censorship results in the strangulation of culture and the withering of creativity and intellect. All those things are visible in China right now and, quite frankly, I’m eyeing the exit. July, 2017 is marked in my calendar as the leaving date. I love my job but this country is grinding me down…

But I digress…

This week is the big Communist Party Congress in Beijing where the party members “vote” on various matters of policy. Perhaps not as ridiculous as the spectacle in the United States right now in the run-up to the shitshow election in November, it is still nonetheless a bizarre festival of all that’s wrong with politics.

But never mind the implications for the wider world – my primary concern is a lack of internet access. In order to circumvent the aforementioned censorship of the internet, I’m required to use a VPN. Usually it is an annoying struggle, but spending money on a decent VPN can save a lot of hassle, especially when one works online most days. During this time of political farce, however, the government exercises its powers to shutdown access to the truth. As we know – or used to think before the rise of Trump – truth is a grave threat to bullshit.

The most commonly used VPN in China seems to be Astrill, and that was hit hard and fast. My service, ExpressVPN, stayed largely in tact until yesterday, when it faltered badly. Today has been a royal pain in my ass. Accessing almost any foreign-based website without a VPN has been nearly impossible, too.

So, for those reasons and more (think: work) I haven’t yet posted to this blog.

As means of an apology, here are two photos I’ve taken over the past 24 hours, in a low enough resolution to upload via one of the few working VPN servers I can currently access. They are the very essence of life in the bizarre land we know as The Middle Kingdom: