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From Albion to Shangri-La: A Review

beatdom:

image

From Albion to Shangri-La consists of collected excerpts from Peter Doherty’s journals, circa 2008 to 2013, with an added selection from his tour diaries, all rounded off with a previously unpublished interview with editor, Nina Antonia – the rock journalist’s rock journalist, no stranger…

http://www.beatdom.com/?p=3270

alright. this is the first and only gif i’ll ever post on tumblr. and here’s the reason:
yrs ago, i signed up for google plus. it was shite, so i quit. then i came back because ppl kept adding me and, hey, when you run a small publishing company you really need all the social media help you can get.
anyways, today i went to falkirk and tested out my new phone camera (it’s a huawei ascend y300, in case you’re wondering). i took photos of the new kelpies (see previous post) and the falkirk wheel (see gif). 
i came home and wondered how i’d back up my photos. given that the phone runs on android, i went for the obvious choice: google plus auto backup. 
i’ve got to say that i was thoroughly impressed when it mashed together a couple of photos into this gif. obviously i wasn’t planning on doing that, and so it’s comprised of very few images, and is thus quite poor quality, but the fact that it was intelligent enough really blew my mind.
given that twitter and facebook have both swindled me out of a lot of money this week, google plus has now worked its way into my favors. hurray for google plus! 

alright. this is the first and only gif i’ll ever post on tumblr. and here’s the reason:

yrs ago, i signed up for google plus. it was shite, so i quit. then i came back because ppl kept adding me and, hey, when you run a small publishing company you really need all the social media help you can get.

anyways, today i went to falkirk and tested out my new phone camera (it’s a huawei ascend y300, in case you’re wondering). i took photos of the new kelpies (see previous post) and the falkirk wheel (see gif). 

i came home and wondered how i’d back up my photos. given that the phone runs on android, i went for the obvious choice: google plus auto backup. 

i’ve got to say that i was thoroughly impressed when it mashed together a couple of photos into this gif. obviously i wasn’t planning on doing that, and so it’s comprised of very few images, and is thus quite poor quality, but the fact that it was intelligent enough really blew my mind.

given that twitter and facebook have both swindled me out of a lot of money this week, google plus has now worked its way into my favors. hurray for google plus! 

wow. maybe facebook’s data collection isn’t quite as good as we expected…

wow. maybe facebook’s data collection isn’t quite as good as we expected…

beatdom:

Beatdom #15 is finally on sale! You can now buy it for the very reasonable price of $8.99 on Amazon. 
This issue is all about WAR. People think of the Beats as post-war, entirely separate and disinterested. But we disagree. In this issue we explore the relationship between the Beats and war, from Kerouac and Ginsberg in the navy, to Burroughs’ intergalactic battles, to the influence of postmemory, the British Beat movement as growing out of WWII, and we also talk to (Colonel) Gordon Ball about Allen Ginsberg teaching in the U.S. Army. 
Here’s a sneak peak at the contents: 
Essays
The Beat Generation at War – David S. Wills
War all the Time – Neil Reddy
War Upon War – Katie Stewart
Everything Changed After the War – GK Stritch
Borne Out of War – Philip Willey
Blood and Black Power on the Streets of Chicago – Pat Thomas
Howl of the Abject – Pamela Kidd
Poetry
The Pickle Shelves – Holly Day
Cold September Air – Marc Olmsted
Morning on my Island in these Times of War – Chris Astwood
GodCop – AD Hitchen
Taxes – Brian Kuhr
Fiction
Blood Drive – Michael Lund
Fringe – Larry Duthie
Interviews and Reviews
Gordon Ball Interview – David S. Wills
The Magical Universe of William S. Burroughs – David S. Wills

beatdom:

Beatdom #15 is finally on sale! You can now buy it for the very reasonable price of $8.99 on Amazon. 

This issue is all about WAR. People think of the Beats as post-war, entirely separate and disinterested. But we disagree. In this issue we explore the relationship between the Beats and war, from Kerouac and Ginsberg in the navy, to Burroughs’ intergalactic battles, to the influence of postmemory, the British Beat movement as growing out of WWII, and we also talk to (Colonel) Gordon Ball about Allen Ginsberg teaching in the U.S. Army. 

Here’s a sneak peak at the contents: 

Essays

The Beat Generation at War – David S. Wills

War all the Time – Neil Reddy

War Upon War – Katie Stewart

Everything Changed After the War – GK Stritch

Borne Out of War – Philip Willey

Blood and Black Power on the Streets of Chicago – Pat Thomas

Howl of the Abject – Pamela Kidd

Poetry

The Pickle Shelves – Holly Day

Cold September Air – Marc Olmsted

Morning on my Island in these Times of War – Chris Astwood

GodCop – AD Hitchen

Taxes – Brian Kuhr

Fiction

Blood Drive – Michael Lund

Fringe – Larry Duthie

Interviews and Reviews

Gordon Ball Interview – David S. Wills

The Magical Universe of William S. Burroughs – David S. Wills

the world is fucked. ppl can’t see that this is actually how things are. they laugh at statements like the above because they are brainwashed into thinking otherwise. 
i saw an advert for the uk army yesterday at the cinema. they are trying to get ppl to sign up to improve their lives, but they are also glorifying fighting and national defense. 
a more accurate advert would ask questions like: “do you want to kill babies? would you destroy another human being’s home just because you were told to?”
i’m not saying that soldiers are bad ppl, but rather they are victims of brainwashing. yet, unlike the twitter/fb masses who love war and death, these ppl have to actually do the killing. 
in the end, the only ones who win are the ppl who make profit on war - the ones who trick others into killing for them, while the masses cheer on the slaughter.

the world is fucked. ppl can’t see that this is actually how things are. they laugh at statements like the above because they are brainwashed into thinking otherwise. 

i saw an advert for the uk army yesterday at the cinema. they are trying to get ppl to sign up to improve their lives, but they are also glorifying fighting and national defense. 

a more accurate advert would ask questions like: “do you want to kill babies? would you destroy another human being’s home just because you were told to?”

i’m not saying that soldiers are bad ppl, but rather they are victims of brainwashing. yet, unlike the twitter/fb masses who love war and death, these ppl have to actually do the killing. 

in the end, the only ones who win are the ppl who make profit on war - the ones who trick others into killing for them, while the masses cheer on the slaughter.

(via scandinavian-misanthropy)

israel is evil but the most troubling part are the ppl around the world who defend israel, for these are the ppl whose insatiable bloodlust and willful ignorance lends support and justification to all genocides, atrocities, and tyrannies. 

a year and a half into tumblr and i still don’t know how to answer comments on my damn posts. anyway, here’s one i want to answer: beatbopped said: I’m amazed that this is available in China, is my idea of their censorship laws wrong?

yes and no. everyone’s idea of censorship in china is wrong. we think of the chinese govt as insanely controlling, whereas they’re basically no worse than our own. the difference, i suppose, is that they’re proud of that fact and admit it. 
anyway, china does censor stuff, but it’s typically more related to making money than social control. why is facebook illegal? to protect chinese copies of facebook. what about google? same. twitter? same.
the media is perhaps a bit different. it’s more about social stability. but it’s not as bad as we think in the west. 
china may be somewhat conservative, but homosexuality is less of a taboo than we might think. interestingly, it’s only in recent history that it became taboo. until the christian missionaries entered the scene, being gay was considered a perfectly acceptable - albeit temporary - stage of life. they viewed it as normal… although a gay person would be expected to procreate with someone of the opposite sex.
although the cover of this book seems a bit tame, almost avoiding the fact that it is essentially about homosexuality, and therefore may be viewed as ducking the censors, the synopsis is pretty straightforward. as for the reviews: ppl seem primarily occupied with the fact that it’s more “straightforward” or “comprehensible” than naked lunch, which is the only other burroughs book on the market in china.
  1. a year and a half into tumblr and i still don’t know how to answer comments on my damn posts. anyway, here’s one i want to answer: 
    beatbopped said: I’m amazed that this is available in China, is my idea of their censorship laws wrong?
  2. yes and no. everyone’s idea of censorship in china is wrong. we think of the chinese govt as insanely controlling, whereas they’re basically no worse than our own. the difference, i suppose, is that they’re proud of that fact and admit it. 
  3. anyway, china does censor stuff, but it’s typically more related to making money than social control. why is facebook illegal? to protect chinese copies of facebook. what about google? same. twitter? same.
  4. the media is perhaps a bit different. it’s more about social stability. but it’s not as bad as we think in the west. 
  5. china may be somewhat conservative, but homosexuality is less of a taboo than we might think. interestingly, it’s only in recent history that it became taboo. until the christian missionaries entered the scene, being gay was considered a perfectly acceptable - albeit temporary - stage of life. they viewed it as normal… although a gay person would be expected to procreate with someone of the opposite sex.
  6. although the cover of this book seems a bit tame, almost avoiding the fact that it is essentially about homosexuality, and therefore may be viewed as ducking the censors, the synopsis is pretty straightforward. as for the reviews: ppl seem primarily occupied with the fact that it’s more “straightforward” or “comprehensible” than naked lunch, which is the only other burroughs book on the market in china.